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Gluten Sensitivity, its not just a myth!

Finally, some research has illustrated what so many of us knew:  Even with a negative celiac test it is still possible to have a dramatic sensitivity to gluten proteins.

Have a quick look at this article from the Wall Street Journal “Clues to Gluten Sensitivity” from March 15th, 2011 publication by Melinda Beck.

Lisa Rayburn felt dizzy, bloated and exhausted. Wynn Avocette suffered migraines and body aches. Stephanie Meade’s 4-year-old daughter had constipation and threw temper tantrums.


All three tested negative for celiac disease, a severe intolerance to gluten, a protein found in wheat and other grains. But after their doctors ruled out other causes, all three adults did their own research and cut gluten—and saw the symptoms subside.

A new study in the journal BMC Medicine may shed some light on why. It shows gluten can set off a distinct reaction in the intestines and the immune system, even in people who don’t have celiac disease.

“For the first time, we have scientific evidence that indeed, gluten sensitivity not only exists, but is very different from celiac disease,” says lead author Alessio Fasano, medical director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Celiac Research. (Click here for the full article).

There are testing options available to confirm a gluten sensitivity.  They include an elimination and challenge, EAV testing or antibody tests (IgG and IgA).   In the next blog, we’ll discuss these three options and the differences between them.



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